Saddles/Tack

THREE-GENERATIONS OF LEGENDARY ARTISTRY

Harris Leather & Silverworks sets the standard for the show horse community A show horse decked out with a custom Harris saddle enhanced with ornate silverwork. By Lynn Ascrizzi Anyone deeply involved in big-time show horse events, such as The All-American Quarter Horse Congress,is well aware of the stature of Harris Leather & Silverworks and their hand-built, silver-spangled saddles and other artfully craftedleather tack.  “Our saddles and silverwork are what
Saddles/Tack

Frecker’s Saddlery: A Family Affair

Karsten and Kent Frecker shown with a couple floral carved saddles. By Nick Pernokas The tall cowboy eased through the crowd at the tradeshow.  Every once in a while there was a flash of recognition from other shoppers, but then they went on about their business. This was Vegas after all. The National Finals Rodeo sported several large trade shows filled with western merchandise and it was easy to miss
Saddles/Tack

Tad Mizwa: A Lasting Impression

This Mother Hubbard saddle is representative of the historical miniature reproductions that Tad made. The base price on his miniature saddles in the 1990's was $3000. By Nick Pernokas John Kelley always eagerly anticipated his monthly copy of Shop Talk! Magazine. The Morton, Illinois, leatherworker had been working with leather since he was 10. He had created beautiful knife sheaths, holsters and handbags, many featuring beautiful carving and fine hand
Saddles/Tack

Monroe Veach: A Ten Dollar Horse and a Forty Dollar Saddle

By Nick Pernokas Monroe performing a rope trick with his daughter Letty in 1946. The young cowboy dropped his bag on the ground and loosened the cinches on his saddle. The saddle he set a little more carefully on the small Parkerton railway stop platform. After he slipped the bridle off over the old mare’s ears, he slapped her on the butt, to send her on the familiar journey home.
Saddles/Tack

Taking Chances and Building Saddles

By Liisa Andreassen Kevin Parrish His real name is Kevin Parrish, but he’s affectionately known by most as “The Saddle Guy.” At the age of 13, he started out in the business washing saddles that were in for repair in his father’s hobby saddle repair shop. He worked there through high school performing various tasks such as disassembling, washing, oiling and reassembling saddles. More than 30 years later, he’s still
Artisan

Saddlemaker Ron Ross

Sixty Years of Leather at the Crossroads of America  By Gene Fowler  "I clean up good," jokes Ron, describing this photo. Since 1977, Ron and his family have lived north of Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he has raised Belgians, Quarter horses, goats, and sheep and made saddles and other leather goods. This past February—on the 18th, to be exact—All-Around Top Hand Leather Artist Ron Ross of St. Joe, Indiana, celebrated
Boot/Shoe Saddles/Tack

A One-Man Leather Shop

Long-time leatherwork instructor, Mike DeWitt, keeps his heritage craft alive and well in Oklahoma By Lynn Ascrizzi Michael DeWitt, at the workbench in his leather workshop, with saddle trees and stirrups in the background. You never know where a passion for the age-old art of leathercraft will take you. For Michael DeWitt, owner and operator of DeWitt Custom Leatherworks, the long and winding trail that leading to his current workshop